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U.S. Customs and Border Protection seizes more counterfeit Pokemon figures, 2nd time in month

Posted 6/15/20

Just one month after seizing more than 86,000 counterfeit Pokemon action figures, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers in Harrisburg seized more than 120,000 more counterfeit Pokemon action …

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection seizes more counterfeit Pokemon figures, 2nd time in month

Posted

Just one month after seizing more than 86,000 counterfeit Pokemon action figures, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers in Harrisburg seized more than 120,000 more counterfeit Pokemon action figures.

If authentic, this latest seizure would have had a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of more than $840,000, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

This seizure consisted of 20 boxes in three shipments that arrived from Hong Kong May 18-26. Officers inspected the shipment and observed 120,480 small Pokemon action figures. Officers then confirmed with the trademark holder that the figurines were counterfeit. Officers seized the cache Wednesday. The shipments were destined to an address in Snyder County.

The figurines are small and pose a potential choking hazard to children. Additionally, counterfeit toys tend to be coated in excessive levels of lead paint. No lead testing was conducted on these toys, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

“The Pokemon slogan is ‘Gotta catch ‘em all’’ and Customs and Border Protection officers are trying to do just that to these counterfeit and potentially dangerous toys,” said Casey Durst, CBP’s director of field operations in Baltimore. “CBP officers remain steadfast in our commitment to intercepting counterfeit products, especially those products that could seriously harm American consumers.”

On May 13, CBP officers seized the previous shipment of 86,400 Pokemon action figures. If authentic, those figurines would have had a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of more than $600,000.

CBP protects businesses and consumers every day through an aggressive Intellectual Property Rights enforcement program. Importation of counterfeit merchandise can cause significant revenue loss, damage the U.S. economy, and threaten the health and safety of the American people, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection press release said.

More than 90 percent of all intellectual property seizures occur in the international mail and express environments.

The People’s Republic of China (mainland China and Hong Kong) remained the primary source economy for seized counterfeit and pirated goods, accounting for 83 percent of all IPR seizures and 92 percent of the estimated MSRP value of all IPR seizures, U.S. Customs and Border Protection reported.