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Middletown, Lower Dauphin middle schools crown geography bee champs

Posted 3/4/20

Middletown and Lower Dauphin middle schools each held their geography bees in January.

At LDMS, after 13 rounds designed to test students’ geographical knowledge, it came down to two …

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Middletown, Lower Dauphin middle schools crown geography bee champs

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Middletown and Lower Dauphin middle schools each held their geography bees in January.

At LDMS, after 13 rounds designed to test students’ geographical knowledge, it came down to two eighth-graders.

Adrian Olweiler and Peter Otto sat face-to-face on the Lower Dauphin Middle School stage Jan. 28. Four feet apart, they were given three questions whose answers were to be written on a white board and shown to the judges simultaneously.

After three championship questions, Peter was declared the school winner.

The son of Nicholas and Laura Otto, Peter smiled, stood and shook Adrian’s hand.

For his efforts, he received a medal and the right to add his name to the school’s list of previous champions.

A few weeks after the bee, he took the online qualifying exam and will hear this month if his score was high enough to make it to the state bee March 27.

To make it to the championship rounds, the boys navigated seven preliminary rounds with topics such as states, states’ nicknames, wild places, world civilizations and cities of the world. After the prelims the field was narrowed from 20 to eight.

These eight finalists competed for an additional six rounds on topics such as oceans, continents, map skills, and countries of the world.

In the last finals round, eighth-grader Sammy Garcia and seventh-grader William Harhaj were knocked out together and were declared co-finishers for third place.

Then Adrian and Peter went to the finals after a short intermission.

“This is a very challenging contest,” said Johnathan Breininger, middle school assistant principal and bee moderator. “It takes a lot to make it through to the final round — confidence, patience, concentration, and, of course, a whole lot of geographical knowledge.”

The MAMS geography bee was held Jan. 7. The champion was sixth-grader Eyassu Yosedik.

The top 10 finalists in the school (determined by a written test) had to answer a question for each round. After two incorrect answers, participants were eliminated.

Questions and answers are not disclosed because all questions are identical for all school competitions around the country.

Yosedik placed among the top 100 intermediate students in Pennsylvania to earn a trip to the state competition March 27 at the State Museum in Harrisburg.