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Here are more comments from residents at the Londonderry zoning change hearing

By Laura Hayes

laurahayes@pressandjournal.com

717-944-4628
Posted 9/11/19

Here is a sampling of what others said at the Sept. 3 public hearing on proposed zoning changes in Londonderry Township.

• Township tax collector Loren Bowen voiced his support, saying people …

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Here are more comments from residents at the Londonderry zoning change hearing

Posted

Here is a sampling of what others said at the Sept. 3 public hearing on proposed zoning changes in Londonderry Township.

• Township tax collector Loren Bowen voiced his support, saying people coming into the township are struggling to pay their taxes. The public sewer is coming whether or not they want it, he said.

“If the entire cost of this project gets dumped on the homeowners that are here now, it’s going to put a lot of people out of their homes,” Bowen said. The township has worked hard to find partners, and “it looks like this is really the best option we’re going to have, and I think without this, our homeowners are going to be in trouble.”

• Justin Nicholson, who owns the River House Bar and Grill at 2495 E. Harrisburg Pike, during the hearing recalled when he had a scare that his septic system failed. We got lucky, he said, “but it was a scare, and it was a touch of reality as to where I could be if it failed.”

“I believe these people are trying to do what is in our best interest, and I can’t afford another dollar in taxes,” Nicholson said.

• Courtney Archer lives on Beagle Road. She said her major concern was the development behind Saturday’s Market, near Londonderry Elementary School.

“As a parent with three children that are either there or will go there, the noise, the air pollution, the traffic is all very concerning to me,” Archer said. “It’s also concerning from a property value standpoint. I know there’s a concern that raising taxes will decrease our property value, but for me being next to potentially mini-warehouses or a logistics site will decrease my property value.”

• Katcha Neale lives right across the border in Conewago Township near Vision Group Ventures’ potential development, noting that the tract they were proposing to develop was identified as prime farmland in Dauphin County’s Comprehensive Plan.

“I’m not in favor of excessive development, and I really think you should be a little choosier. Prime farmland should not be on the top of the list just because it’s close to 230 and happens to be attractive to a developer who’s dangling some sewer money. I know you’ve worked hard on this project, but there might be some other spaces that would work better,” Neale said.