locally owned since 1854

Kunkel fourth-graders enjoy a new view; program brings virtual reality goggles to elementary

By Laura Hayes

laurahayes@pressandjournal.com

717-944-4628
Posted 12/21/18

To Kunkel Elementary School fourth-grader Colin Buggy, it felt like he was an astronaut.

Kunkel fourth-graders recently had the chance to test virtual reality goggles brought to the school by the …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Kunkel fourth-graders enjoy a new view; program brings virtual reality goggles to elementary

Posted

To Kunkel Elementary School fourth-grader Colin Buggy, it felt like he was an astronaut.

Kunkel fourth-graders recently had the chance to test virtual reality goggles brought to the school by the Girl Scouts STEM Mobile program.

Through the goggles, the students could see images as if they were right in front of them. One of the exercises transported the students beneath a night sky.

Between Colin and classmate Kaydence Zlogar, they could see constellations, planets and satellites.

“It felt like I was in outer space doing a NASA mission on a spaceship,” he said Nov. 29.

Kaydence said she felt like she was an astronaut tethered to a ship.

“It was cool,” she said.

The students also had the opportunity to ride on a rollercoaster and “travel” to different cities across the world such as Hong Kong and Frankfurt, Germany. Fourth-grade teacher Krystal Firster said the students could see buildings that they’ve never seen before, such as the Eiffel Tower.

This isn’t the first time that the Girl Scouts STEM Mobile program has come to Kunkel. Firster said last year, the Girl Scouts led a coding and robotics unit.

This year, teachers asked Girl Scouts to bring virtual reality goggles. Firster said she wanted to expose students to something they might not have experienced or might not be available in school.

“The kids are really into STEM,” she said.

Firster would love to be able to use the goggles in the classroom, specifically for social studies and science lessons. She was glad the Girl Scouts chose to do a lesson on the solar system because the students would be learning about it later in the school year.

While the students are no strangers to STEM curriculum — which stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics — Firster said the lessons often don’t involve technology such as the virtual reality goggles. For example, the students were to participate in the global “Hour of Code” event during Computer Science Education Week Dec. 3-9. 

“This was a different was of thinking about STEM for these kids,” she said.