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‘I worry about homeless all the time’: Lidle leaves hats, gloves, scarves at subway for anyone to take

By Laura Hayes

laurahayes@pressandjournal.com

717-944-4628
Posted 2/6/19

It was 13 degrees outside Thursday when Dave Lidle got out of his car at the back of the Karns parking lot near the entrance to the subway that goes under the railroad tracks.

Lidle carried …

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‘I worry about homeless all the time’: Lidle leaves hats, gloves, scarves at subway for anyone to take

Posted

It was 13 degrees outside Thursday when Dave Lidle got out of his car at the back of the Karns parking lot near the entrance to the subway that goes under the railroad tracks.

Lidle carried several plastic shopping bags filled with smaller bags containing hats, gloves, scarves and socks. He used twist ties to fasten the baggies to the chainlink fence.

Phrases such as “Be kind” and words such as “Love” are written on the back of the bags. The front of the bag reads, “I am not lost … please take me!! God bless you!”

Lidle has been hanging the bags at the entrance to the subway for several weeks. He has refilled the fence six times and estimates that he has left about 150 pieces of clothing.

“It’s my way of helping out in the way that I can,” he said.

Lidle was inspired after he saw a news report of someone doing something similar in York. The subway was a good place to put the hats and gloves because, as Lidle said, it is a visible from Karns.

With temperatures below freezing, Thursday was the perfect day to have warm clothes available for anyone who needed it.

“People need it. I worry about the homeless all the time,” he said.

Retired, Lidle loves to stay busy. In 2017, he made headlines after he cleaned up the trash in the subway, something he continues to do twice a week. Lately, he’s been helping fix the cemetery on West Harrisburg Pike on the border of Lower Swatara Township and Highspire.

He buys the hats, gloves, socks and scarves at stores like the Dollar Tree. Sitting at his kitchen table, he places the clothing in bags. One weekend, he put 32 articles of clothing on the fence, and by Sunday, everything was gone.

“Hopefully someone is enjoying them,” Lidle said.

He said he plans to continue to do it until the weather warms up.