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Get trained so you can save a life, too: Editorial

Posted 9/19/18

We have heroes around us every day.

Many of them wear uniforms, be it military, law enforcement or medical personnel.

They are trained to help others. But sometimes it takes more than those who …

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Get trained so you can save a life, too: Editorial

Posted

We have heroes around us every day.

Many of them wear uniforms, be it military, law enforcement or medical personnel.

They are trained to help others. But sometimes it takes more than those who make it their profession to help save a life.

As we reported last week, Jim Neuschwander of Derry Township is lucky to be alive. The 48-year-old information technology director was running on the track at Middletown Area High School on the morning of Saturday, Aug. 4, when he collapsed.

Another person who happened to be there that day was Steve Boyland, who is trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and in outdoor emergencies. He, along with one of those heroes in uniform, Middletown Police Department Sgt. Scott Yoder, who is also highly skilled in CPR, saved Neuschwander’s life.

“When I got to him he was on his stomach. I rolled him over and I could tell immediately his pupils were distended (expanded) and he wasn’t breathing, and I didn’t see his chest moving, so I immediately started doing CPR” and chest compressions and breaths, Boyland told the Press & Journal.

Yoder was nearby, looking for speeders just down the road from the high school campus, in the 900 block of North Union Street, so he responded because he was nearby.

Yoder got out of his cruiser, ran to the scene, and started assisting Boyland with CPR. As one of the two men would tire out, the other took over, until emergency medical service personnel arrived.

Boyland and Yoder were presented — and deservingly so — with a Lifesaving Award by Middletown Mayor James H. Curry III before the start of a borough council meeting Sept. 4.

Doctors told Neuschwander he had an arrhythmia and that his heart had stopped beating.

Neuschwander has no doubts that Boyland and Yoder, working together, saved his life.

“Oh absolutely,” he said. “No question about it.”

What would you do in an emergency such as this? Are you trained in CPR? Could you help?

Anyone can be a lifesaver with proper training.

Remember that Pennsylvania has a Good Samaritan Act: “Any person who renders emergency care, first aid or rescue at the scene of an emergency, or moves the person receiving such care, first aid and rescue to a hospital or other place of medical care, shall not be liable to such person for any civil damages as a result of any acts or omissions in rendering the emergency care, first aid or rescue, or moving the person receiving the same to a hospital or other place of medical care, except any acts or omissions intentionally designed to harm or any grossly negligent or omissions which result in harm to the person receiving the emergency care, first aid or rescue or being moved to a hospital or other place of medical care.”

Boyland has gone through much training.

“It feels wonderful, absolutely wonderful, to be able to help and to use my training. It feels great.”

Give yourself the chance to feel great in the face of potential tragedy.

Go to www.redcross.org/take-a-class and enter your zip code to find classes for CPR or other life-saving training in the area, or call 800-RED CROSS.

You won’t regret it.

You might save the life of a stranger. But you might just save the life of someone you love.