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Fulling Mill Road Dairy Queen may reopen; eatery closed after inspection issues, but 2 are interested

By Laura Hayes

laurahayes@pressandjournal.com

717-944-4628
Posted 3/20/19

The Dairy Queen Brazier at 1100 Fulling Mill Road in Lower Swatara Township is closed, but two people are interested in reopening it.

The two prospective new owners are going through a process …

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Fulling Mill Road Dairy Queen may reopen; eatery closed after inspection issues, but 2 are interested

Posted

The Dairy Queen Brazier at 1100 Fulling Mill Road in Lower Swatara Township is closed, but two people are interested in reopening it.

The two prospective new owners are going through a process that includes vetting them financially, as well as being approved for a lease by the owner of the building, said Brian Dmochowski, who is territory operator for American Dairy Queen Corp.

Dmochowski is responsible for all Dairy Queen franchises in Dauphin, Cumberland, Adams and Franklin counties, under a contractual arrangement with American Dairy Queen Corp., which is based in Minneapolis.

“Nothing has been signed yet,” Dmochowski said. He could not comment on how long it will take.

However, “we do have the intention of reopening it” as a Dairy Queen, he said.

Dmochowski said the restaurant first opened as a Dairy Queen in 1998 or 1999.

Business has grown as the surrounding area has grown, a trend that Dmochowski said he sees continuing.

There are 12 other Dairy Queens in the four-county area, Dmochowski added.

Previous owners decided to close the restaurant, after it was found to be out of compliance with Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture food regulations, following a Feb. 25 inspection, said department spokeswoman Shannon Powers.

The inspection was prompted by ownership of the Dairy Queen changing hands in early January. The new owner failed to renew their license, Powers said.

Following the Feb. 25 inspection, the department ordered the owner to renew the license for the restaurant, and to correct the violations. Instead, the owner has decided to close the restaurant, Powers said.

“They received three notices that they had failed to renew their license,” she added. “They chose not to renew.”

The owner, identified in the inspection as Murray Rojas, did not return a phone call from the Press & Journal seeking comment.

Referring to the Feb. 25 inspection, Powers said that some of the violations found were new, and others were repeat violations from previous inspections before the Dairy Queen had changed ownership.

Among violations identified in the Feb. 25 inspection were food-contact surfaces not being cleaned and sanitized; indications of the presence of insects, animals and rodents; contamination during food preparation, storage and display; improper storage of in-use utensils; single-use/single-service articles not being properly stored and used; and non-food contact surfaces not being clean, according to the inspection, which can be found on the Department of Agriculture website.

The inspection also noted the lack of a person in charge “demonstrating knowledge of the food code or performing duties related to it,” Powers said.