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Area mom will be featured in Times Square public service announcement for colorectal cancer

Posted 2/15/19

Hershey resident Cari Lopez Bryan will be one of the 29 people featured in a new public service announcement in Times Square in March for Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

Bryan, a stage IV …

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Area mom will be featured in Times Square public service announcement for colorectal cancer

Posted

Hershey resident Cari Lopez Bryan will be one of the 29 people featured in a new public service announcement in Times Square in March for Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

Bryan, a stage IV colorectal cancer survivor, is an awareness ambassador for Fight Colorectal Cancer, an advocacy organization focused on colorectal cancer policy and research. The PSA will launch during the NASDAQ opening bell ceremony at 9 a.m. Feb. 27.

Colon and rectal cancers (colorectal cancer) make up the second-leading cause of cancer deaths among men and women combined, according to Fight CRC, and 60 percent of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented with screening. It is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer, with 140,250 estimated new cases in 2018 and 50,630 estimated deaths in 2018.

Bryan is trying to raise awareness about the importance of screening using her story in an effort to save lives, according to the group.

“I was diagnosed at the age of 34. I am a mom, a wife, and a nurse. I continue to battle cancer because I plan on being here to raise both my daughters and grow old with my husband. I will never give up hope for a cure,” Bryan said.

To learn more, visit fightcrc.org

About colorectal cancer, from Fight CRC:

• People with a first-degree relative (parent, sibling or child) with colon cancer are two to three times more likely to develop the cancer than those without a family history.

• 25 percent of people diagnosed with colorectal cancer have a family history.

• 10 to 11 percent of colon cancers and 18 percent of rectal cancers are diagnosed in individuals younger than age 50.

• Up to 22 percent of colorectal cancer cases diagnosed before the age of 50 are associated hereditary cancer syndromes; additional cases are related to inflammatory bowel disease.

• Colorectal cancers in individuals under 50 are more likely associated with symptoms. It’s important to seek medical care for unexplained persistent rectal bleeding and other signs and symptoms.