Press and Journal

Switch to desktop Register Login

Middletown Area High School announces honor roll

 

Middletown Area High School has announced its Distinguished Honor Roll and Honor Roll for the second marking period.

For the full story, CLICK HERE to subscribe to the Press And Journal.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 February 2015 15:46

Hits: 146

Man charged with alleged rape of student in 2012

Lower Swatara Twp. police arrested an Adams County man who they say allegedly spiked a Penn State Harrisburg student’s drink and sexually assaulted her in an off-campus apartment in 2012.

 

For the full story, CLICK HERE to subscribe to the Press And Journal.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 February 2015 15:42

Hits: 135

Cancer survivor visits Mini-THON Committee

thonpic2 18 15WEB

 

 

Like most families, the Joseph family took their baby Janessa to the doctor’s office for a wellness visit when she was 18 months old.

Things took an unusual turn when they found something odd with her blood work, and they were sent to the hospital. After some more tests, a doctor told them to go home and prepare to spend the next week in the Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Little Janessa had acute myeloid leukemia – a cancer with a 50 percent survivability rate.

For the full story, CLICK HERE to subscribe to the Press And Journal.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 February 2015 15:36

Hits: 405

Supervisors join county rehab program

 

The Londonderry Twp. supervisors have voted 3-0 to join the Dauphin County Land Bank, a program designed to get abandoned, blighted properties back on the tax rolls.

Supervisors Mike Geyer, Bart Shellenhamer and Ron Kopp voted in favor of signing on as a participating municipality. Supervisors Anna Dale and Mel Hershey were absent.

Skip Memmi, representing the county and the land bank, outlined the program for the supervisors and provided photos of two properties in Susquehanna Twp. that are the land bank’s current projects. The first project, a rehabbed home in Susquehanna Twp., is back on the market.

Memmi said the land bank will never use eminent domain, a government seizure of private property, to acquire real estate for its projects. He also said that the land bank’s projects are chosen to eliminate blight, not to make money.

Land bank projects do not attract private investors because they have lower potential for profit, so Memmi said they are not competing with “house flippers.”

The land bank encourages municipal officials to suggest blighted properties that it could acquire. When properties are in the land bank’s possession, the land bank’s directors decide whether to raze or rehabilitate the buildings on the property.

Steve Letavic, the township’s manager, endorsed the program and heartily encouraged the board to sign the memorandum of understanding with the land bank.

Kopp questioned why anyone would refuse to participate, as eliminating blighted properties increases the value of surrounding homes and gets the property itself back on the tax rolls. Memmi explained that after the project is completed and the property is sold, the collectors of property taxes agree to provide half of the tax money back to the land bank for five years.

Memmi said the land bank had an opportunity to acquire a property in Steelton from its mortgage holder at no cost, but the Steelton-Highspire School Board refused to sign a memorandum of understanding with the land bank.

“We would appreciate members of municipalities reaching out to the school district to encourage them to join,” he said. He plans to approach the Lower Dauphin School Board in March.

Londonderry Twp. is the 11th municipality to join the program, and the second in the Lower Dauphin school District to join. Hummelstown also joined the program.

Eric Wise: 717-944-4628, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 February 2015 15:21

Hits: 96

Middletown cop rescues dog from icy Swatara

dogrescuepic2 18 15Photo by Allison Smith/The Sun, Hummelstown - - Middletown Police Sgt. Richard Hiester, left, with the dog he saved and Rusty Harlacker, who called Dauphin County 9-1-1.

 

The dog was shivering in the cold late January waters of Swatara Creek, hanging onto a piece of ice with its front paws. To Middletown police Sgt. Richard Hiester it looked like it had been there for some time and was getting tired – and he wondered how much longer the dog could hold on.

 

The dog was about 15 to 20 feet from shore. Hiester had done plenty of water rescues of both animals and people, especially during the historic flooding of Tropical Storm Lee in September 2011. He found a spot near Iron Mine Run and Swatara Creek Road where he thought he could get closest to the dog.

 

A local man, Rusty Harlacker, was sitting in his parked pickup truck, reading a newspaper, on Friday, Jan. 23 when he spotted the dog in the water. Harlacker called Dauphin County 9-1-1. The dispatcher couldn’t tell if that part of the creek was in the territory of Middletown police or in Londonderry Twp. which is served by the Pennsylvania State Police.

 

Hiester got there first.

 

Hiester didn’t think he was putting himself at risk, but he was a bit concerned about getting wet. The air temperature was below freezing, somewhere in the 20s.

 

“If I fall in, call 9-1-1 again,” Hiester said half jokingly to Harlacker.

 

Hiester stepped off a cinder block and onto some ice. 

 

The ice really wasn’t thick enough to hold him. He had tied one end of a rope around a tree, and the other end around himself.

 

He carried a catch pole with a noose on the end. The pole was 6feet long - about the same distance now separating Hiester and the dog. 

 

Hiester slipped the noose over the dog’s neck, pulled the noose tight, and pulled him off of the ice.

 

The police officer and the dog walked back to shore, as if they’d been buddies for life.

 

Hiester said the dog looked like a pit bull, but had a collar with tags. The dog was friendly and showed no sign of aggression. Hiester put the dog in his police cruiser so it could get warmed up.

 

Police officers have a chip reader they can use to see if a dog has been implanted with an identification chip by their owner. Fortunately, this dog had such a chip.

 

The chip reader displayed a 24-hour hotline Hiester called to reconcile the dog with its owner, who had recently moved into a house nearby on Swatara Creek Road.

 

“She was very glad to have her dog back,” Hiester said. 

 

Dan Miller: 717-944-4628, or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 February 2015 15:21

Hits: 1009