bridgephoto4 27 16WEBPress And Journal Photo by Eric Wise -- The deteriorating Richardson Road bridge in Lower Swatara Twp. was closed on April 25.

Not long after Lower Swatara Twp. officials learned that the replacement of an old bridge over a small unnamed stream that feeds Laurel Run will be delayed, they learned that the bridge will be closed for safety pending its replacement.

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> Lower Swatara closes two deteriorating bridges

bridgephoto4 27 16WEBPress And Journal Photo by Eric Wise -- The deteriorating Richardson Road bridge in Lower Swatara Twp. was closed on April 25.

Not long after Lower Swatara Twp. officials learned that the replacement of an old bridge over a small unnamed stream that feeds Laurel Run will be delayed, they learned that the bridge will be closed for safety pending its replacement.

For the full story, CLICK HERE to subscribe to the Press And Journal.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 27 April 2016 07:24

Hits: 632

A Dauphin County judge has refused to stop Middletown Borough Council from dissolving the authority that currently owns the town’s water and sewer systems.



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> Judge rejects pleas to save authority

A Dauphin County judge has refused to stop Middletown Borough Council from dissolving the authority that currently owns the town’s water and sewer systems.



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Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 April 2016 16:51

Hits: 93

Middletown Borough Council says Ann Street needs to be paved curb to curb. But how much it will cost, and where – or from whom – the money should come to pay for it are big unknowns.

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> Who should pay to repave Ann Street?

Middletown Borough Council says Ann Street needs to be paved curb to curb. But how much it will cost, and where – or from whom – the money should come to pay for it are big unknowns.

For the full story, CLICK HERE to subscribe to the Press And Journal.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 26 April 2016 16:49

Hits: 410

Council by 7-1 vote during its April 19 meeting approved hiring long-time former public works director Ken Klinepeter as the borough’s new manager.

Klinepeter would be paid $80,000 a year and start on May 4, should he accept the terms and conditions of council’s offer, Council President Ben Kapenstein said.

klinepeterpic9 10 14Press And Journal file photo -- In this September 2014 photo Ken Klinepeter (right) accepts an award congratulating him on his retirement from the borough from Councilor Ben Kapenstein.

Klinepeter worked for the borough for more than 34 years before he retired in August 2014 to become superintendent of public works for Steelton Borough. Klinepeter was making $78, 852.80 a year when he retired from Middletown.

Klinepeter held the Steelton job for about a year before deciding to return to Middletown - this time working for Suez, formerly United Water, the company that in 2015 took over the running of Middletown’s public water and sewer systems as part of a 50-year lease approved by the borough council and borough authority in 2014.

Klinepeter was the last person standing in a process that began in January, when the new council majority that was elected in 2015 began advertising to seek applicants to replace the borough’s previous manager, Tim Konek, who resigned in late December 2015.

Klinepeter was one of 29 applicants for the borough manager position, Kapenstein said. Council’s administration and personnel committee screened the 29 down to eight, and the list was cut to four through phone interviews.

Then council as a whole, plus Mayor James H. Curry III, conducted in-person interviews with the four candidates during closed-door executive sessions, resulting in the emerging of Klinepeter and one other finalist, who were both brought in for a second in-person interview.

Council was also assisted throughout the process by Nancy Hess, a human relations consultant working for the borough as part of the Early Intervention Program, Kapenstein said.

“It came down to Ken’s experience with the borough, his leadership abilities that we had seen in the past,” Kapenstein said. “It was just his overall presence, his love for the community (that) I think is what really made him stick out. How he cares about the people here. You could see that, and anybody who knows him knows that. He’s a known commodity. We think the community will benefit from him being here.”

Kapenstein conceded that Klinepeter has never been a full-time permanent borough manager. However, Klinepeter was acting borough manager for a time during his career working in Middletown, Kapenstein said. Klinepeter also often filled the role of manager on an acting basis when the permanent manager was unavailable, Kapenstein added.

Councilor Diana McGlone voted against hiring Klinepeter. After the meeting, she said her no vote wasn’t about Klinepeter himself, but criticism of a process that she felt should have been more open.

“I would have liked to have seen the top two candidates presented before council and also the public, so that they had an opportunity to see who we were selecting, and then also provide any additional comments to the candidates that we had selected as the top two,” McGlone said.

Kapenstein declined to identify the other finalist.

He defended as “extremely strong” the process that resulted in Klinepeter being chosen. 

“We did it the right way. We went through a competitive process,” he said.

While the previous council presented three finalists for police chief to the public before choosing John Bey in 2014, public interviews for top managers are “not common” in local government, Kapenstein said. He contended that public interviews can also become “unproductive” because of so many people getting involved.

“The people put us in office to make the decisions. We did our due diligence and we made the decision,” Kapenstein said. “We didn’t just pick somebody off the street. We went through the whole process and it was a hard process. Just because it came out that it was Kenny has nothing to do with that we all know Kenny. It was that Kenny was the best qualified candidate that we felt is going to do the best job, and that’s why Kenny was the ultimate choice.”

Council before voting to hire Klinepeter also approved advertising an ordinance change that would loosen the residency requirement for borough manager from having to live in Middletown, to living anywhere within Middletown Area School District.

The proposed change was approved by 7-1 vote, with Councilor Robert Louer dissenting.

> Ken Klinepeter tapped as new Middletown borough manager

Council by 7-1 vote during its April 19 meeting approved hiring long-time former public works director Ken Klinepeter as the borough’s new manager.

Klinepeter would be paid $80,000 a year and start on May 4, should he accept the terms and conditions of council’s offer, Council President Ben Kapenstein said.

klinepeterpic9 10 14Press And Journal file photo -- In this September 2014 photo Ken Klinepeter (right) accepts an award congratulating him on his retirement from the borough from Councilor Ben Kapenstein.

Klinepeter worked for the borough for more than 34 years before he retired in August 2014 to become superintendent of public works for Steelton Borough. Klinepeter was making $78, 852.80 a year when he retired from Middletown.

Klinepeter held the Steelton job for about a year before deciding to return to Middletown - this time working for Suez, formerly United Water, the company that in 2015 took over the running of Middletown’s public water and sewer systems as part of a 50-year lease approved by the borough council and borough authority in 2014.

Klinepeter was the last person standing in a process that began in January, when the new council majority that was elected in 2015 began advertising to seek applicants to replace the borough’s previous manager, Tim Konek, who resigned in late December 2015.

Klinepeter was one of 29 applicants for the borough manager position, Kapenstein said. Council’s administration and personnel committee screened the 29 down to eight, and the list was cut to four through phone interviews.

Then council as a whole, plus Mayor James H. Curry III, conducted in-person interviews with the four candidates during closed-door executive sessions, resulting in the emerging of Klinepeter and one other finalist, who were both brought in for a second in-person interview.

Council was also assisted throughout the process by Nancy Hess, a human relations consultant working for the borough as part of the Early Intervention Program, Kapenstein said.

“It came down to Ken’s experience with the borough, his leadership abilities that we had seen in the past,” Kapenstein said. “It was just his overall presence, his love for the community (that) I think is what really made him stick out. How he cares about the people here. You could see that, and anybody who knows him knows that. He’s a known commodity. We think the community will benefit from him being here.”

Kapenstein conceded that Klinepeter has never been a full-time permanent borough manager. However, Klinepeter was acting borough manager for a time during his career working in Middletown, Kapenstein said. Klinepeter also often filled the role of manager on an acting basis when the permanent manager was unavailable, Kapenstein added.

Councilor Diana McGlone voted against hiring Klinepeter. After the meeting, she said her no vote wasn’t about Klinepeter himself, but criticism of a process that she felt should have been more open.

“I would have liked to have seen the top two candidates presented before council and also the public, so that they had an opportunity to see who we were selecting, and then also provide any additional comments to the candidates that we had selected as the top two,” McGlone said.

Kapenstein declined to identify the other finalist.

He defended as “extremely strong” the process that resulted in Klinepeter being chosen. 

“We did it the right way. We went through a competitive process,” he said.

While the previous council presented three finalists for police chief to the public before choosing John Bey in 2014, public interviews for top managers are “not common” in local government, Kapenstein said. He contended that public interviews can also become “unproductive” because of so many people getting involved.

“The people put us in office to make the decisions. We did our due diligence and we made the decision,” Kapenstein said. “We didn’t just pick somebody off the street. We went through the whole process and it was a hard process. Just because it came out that it was Kenny has nothing to do with that we all know Kenny. It was that Kenny was the best qualified candidate that we felt is going to do the best job, and that’s why Kenny was the ultimate choice.”

Council before voting to hire Klinepeter also approved advertising an ordinance change that would loosen the residency requirement for borough manager from having to live in Middletown, to living anywhere within Middletown Area School District.

The proposed change was approved by 7-1 vote, with Councilor Robert Louer dissenting.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 20 April 2016 10:35

Hits: 531

websteelhigh4 20 16

Homeowners in Steelton and Highspire would see a tax increase in next year’s budget based on the draft budget shared by the Steelton-Highspire School Board on Thursday, April 14.

For the full story, CLICK HERE to subscribe to the Press And Journal.


> Steel-High could raise taxes for 2016-17

websteelhigh4 20 16

Homeowners in Steelton and Highspire would see a tax increase in next year’s budget based on the draft budget shared by the Steelton-Highspire School Board on Thursday, April 14.

For the full story, CLICK HERE to subscribe to the Press And Journal.


Last Updated on Tuesday, 19 April 2016 17:29

Hits: 150

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